Normandy Invasion


The mid-19th century was a time of extraordinary social and artistic transformation. One of the epicenters of invention was France, where a pivotal seaside region forever altered the history of art. Now the Dallas Museum of Art mounts %26#8220;The Lens of Impressionism: Photography and Painting Along the Normandy Coast, 1850 %26#8211; 1874%26#8221; (through May 23), probing this under-known phenomenon. Before the Allies landed on its beach front almost a century later, the coastal area in northwest France across from the English Channel provided inspiration for both painters and photographers %26#8212; the former, a pioneering group undertaking radical experiments in subject matter and plein air technique, and the latter forging a new media and seeking subjects and sites for these explorations. Approximately 90 works richly convey this significant moment, including 40 photographs, many of them vintage prints, alongside 38 paintings, pastels and watercolors, as well as maps and ephemera that evoke the booming tourist culture along the Normandy coast. Watch for canvases by Monet, Manet, Courbet and even American expatriate James McNeill Whistler. However, it%26#8217;s the rare photographs that steal the show: Showcased are images by Gustave Le Gray, Henri Le Seq and Louis-Alphonse Davanne %26#8212; almost forgotten luminaries of 19th-century photography. A beautiful bookend to %26#8220;Lens%26#8221; is %26#8220;Coastlines: Images of Land and Sea,%26#8221; curated by the DMA%26#8217;s Heather MacDonald (April 25 %26#8211; August 22), drawn from the museum%26#8217;s troves as well as private Dallas collections and brimming with works by the inimitable Edward Hopper, John Marin, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Childe Hassam, Stephen Shore, hometown notable Frank Welch and more. 1717 N. Harwood St., 214.922.1200; dallasmuseumofart.org.
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Image: Gustave Le Gray%26#8217;s "Brig Upon the Water," circa 1856; Credit: %26#169; 2004 Detroit Institute of Arts

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Normandy Invasion


The mid-19th century was a time of extraordinary social and artistic transformation. One of the epicenters of invention was France, where a pivotal seaside region forever altered the history of art. Now the Dallas Museum of Art mounts %26#8220;The Lens of Impressionism: Photography and Painting Along the Normandy Coast, 1850 %26#8211; 1874%26#8221; (through May 23), probing this under-known phenomenon. Before the Allies landed on its beach front almost a century later, the coastal area in northwest France across from the English Channel provided inspiration for both painters and photographers %26#8212; the former, a pioneering group undertaking radical experiments in subject matter and plein air technique, and the latter forging a new media and seeking subjects and sites for these explorations. Approximately 90 works richly convey this significant moment, including 40 photographs, many of them vintage prints, alongside 38 paintings, pastels and watercolors, as well as maps and ephemera that evoke the booming tourist culture along the Normandy coast. Watch for canvases by Monet, Manet, Courbet and even American expatriate James McNeill Whistler. However, it%26#8217;s the rare photographs that steal the show: Showcased are images by Gustave Le Gray, Henri Le Seq and Louis-Alphonse Davanne %26#8212; almost forgotten luminaries of 19th-century photography. A beautiful bookend to %26#8220;Lens%26#8221; is %26#8220;Coastlines: Images of Land and Sea,%26#8221; curated by the DMA%26#8217;s Heather MacDonald (April 25 %26#8211; August 22), drawn from the museum%26#8217;s troves as well as private Dallas collections and brimming with works by the inimitable Edward Hopper, John Marin, Yasuo Kuniyoshi, Childe Hassam, Stephen Shore, hometown notable Frank Welch and more. 1717 N. Harwood St., 214.922.1200; dallasmuseumofart.org.
%26nbsp;
Image: Gustave Le Gray%26#8217;s "Brig Upon the Water," circa 1856; Credit: %26#169; 2004 Detroit Institute of Arts

Comments are closed.

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