No White Walls Allowed


Catherine D. Anspon forecasts the best of this month%26rsquo;s sizzling, gallery-wide summer open house %26mdash; photographs of American metropolises rendered in Jell-O, anyone? %26mdash; then reflects upon the Whitney Biennial discoveries that began their ascent in ArtHouston many Julys ago, including a painter whose canvases now command seven figures. (Can you name her?) Read On.

Then and Now
Art collectors and canvas-gazers, save this date: Saturday, July 9. It%26rsquo;s not an art fair, but something homegrown and more organic: ArtHouston, an open house that showcases hometown galleries and touts their hottest talent. Conceived 32 years ago as Introductions to inject life into the slumbering summer art scene, ArtHouston%26rsquo;s exhibitions have taken on greater import through the decades with the increasing global prominence of the Core Program at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston%26rsquo;s Glassell School of Art. Some of the most important debuts of the Core crop during ArtHouston have been: Shahzia Sikander at Barbara Davis Gallery, 1996 (including the artist%26rsquo;s first-ever wall drawing); Julie Mehretu at Barbara Davis Gallery, 1998 (Mehretu%26rsquo;s paintings based on dizzying global maps and urban centers have meteorically risen from $1,000-some then to the million-dollar range now and have earned her a $500,000 MacArthur Award); and Leandro Erlich, whose 1999 %26ldquo;Rain%26rdquo; installation at Moody Gallery went directly to the Whitney Biennial 2000 eight months later. More than Core Fellows have had their day. Beijing-born Yun-Fei Ji soloed in Introductions 1990 at Meredith Long %26amp; Company to go on to the Whitney Biennial in 2004. And in 1999, Inman Gallery showed an obscure San Antonio talent, Dario Robleto, whose arcane conceptual sculptures employed strange materials such as stolen dime-store lipsticks and a cosmetic holder cast from melted LPs; Robleto also hopped the Whitney Biennial train (2004) and earned increasing national renown, all achieved while remaining in Texas.

The Bets Are On

%26ldquo;Dream Skipper%26rdquo; at Barbara Davis Gallery: Though we%26rsquo;re not always a fan of group shows for ArtHouston, any exhibition that combines international painter Mie Olise (who mines magic from modern fairy tales), with notable hometowners Joe Mancuso, Daniel McFarlane and Anthony Shumate is a must (July 9 %26ndash;%26nbsp;September 2).

Aboriginal Offerings at Booker-Lowe Gallery: Billed as %26ldquo;Affordable Australian Aboriginal Art,%26rdquo; this exhibition presents an enticing collecting opportunity to enter the
aboriginal realm, with all work between $250 and $2,500 (July 9 %26ndash;%26nbsp;September 14).

Paul Horn Selects at Colton %26amp; Farb Gallery: The wild man, aka provocateur Paul Horn, returns to curate a group view. Watch for Matt Messinger%26rsquo;s surreal paintings and sculpture tinged with graffiti, as well as Whitney Biennial%26ndash;exhibited Daniel Johnston of the cartoon-inflected drawings (July 9 %26ndash; August 20).%26nbsp;

Liz Hickok%26rsquo;s %26ldquo;Jiggling Geography%26rdquo; at De Santos Gallery: Any photographer who recreates American cityscapes in Jell-O has our attention. This West Coast artist was one of the %26ldquo;Discoveries of the Meeting Place%26rdquo; at FotoFest 2010 (through July 31).

Fashion Fusion at 4411 Montrose: Check out a full-on fashion convergence and pop-up boutique curated by Zo%26euml; Jackson-Jarra at 4411 Montrose%26rsquo;s new project space, The Venue, with daytime shopping (benefitting Yellowstone Academy) capped by an evening runway show (Saturday, July 9).

%26ldquo;A Pixelated Bunch%26rdquo; at G Gallery: Recent Row Houses exhibitor Sapphire Williams selects her faves in an edgy group view incorporating painting, sculpture and performance by some under-known up-and-comers (July 9 %26ndash; 25).

Prescient Portraiture at Hiram Butler Gallery: %26ldquo;Faces%26rdquo; pairs unforgettable visages on paper by Chuck Close, Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, Sherrie Levine, Vik Muniz and Elizabeth Peyton with a quartet of new diaphanous abstractions by Terrell James (through July 23).

Taking It to the Streets at PG Contemporary: Aerosol Warfare, which propels Houston%26rsquo;s graffiti movement, is paired with West Coaster John Stuart Berger to concoct a simmering lowbrow stew in %26ldquo;Street/Science%26rdquo; (July 8 %26ndash;%26nbsp;August 6).

%26ldquo;Art for Japan%26rdquo; at McClain Gallery: Four important Japanese masters contribute to this fund-raising effort for Red Cross Disaster Relief in Japan, including poetic painter Katsumi Hayakawa and lensman Nobuyoshi Araki of the transgressive bondage photography (July 9 %26ndash; August 6).
%26nbsp;%26nbsp;%26nbsp;
Lawrence Lee at Moody Gallery: Idiosyncratic drawings peopled with odd characters are the hallmark of this Texas A%26amp;M Commerce grad, who perhaps not coincidentally comes from the same school where Trenton Doyle Hancock and Robyn O%26rsquo;Neill attended (July 9 %26ndash; August 6).

Images:

Elizabeth Peyton%26rsquo;s RM, 2007, at Hiram Butler Gallery

John Stuart Berger%26rsquo;s Fabglamzilla, 2010, at PG Contemporary

Irene Namok%26rsquo;s Slow Coming in Tide (detail), 2010, at Booker-Lowe Gallery

Liz Hickok%26rsquo;s Coit Tower, 2009, at De Santos Gallery

Mie Olise%26rsquo;s Light House, 2011, at Barbara Davis Gallery

Dario Robleto%26rsquo;s I%26rsquo;ve Kissed Your Mother Twice and Now I%26rsquo;m Working On Your Dad, 1998. Collection Gregory Higgins, Dallas; courtesy Inman Gallery

Comments are closed.

No White Walls Allowed


Catherine D. Anspon forecasts the best of this month%26rsquo;s sizzling, gallery-wide summer open house %26mdash; photographs of American metropolises rendered in Jell-O, anyone? %26mdash; then reflects upon the Whitney Biennial discoveries that began their ascent in ArtHouston many Julys ago, including a painter whose canvases now command seven figures. (Can you name her?) Read On.

Then and Now
Art collectors and canvas-gazers, save this date: Saturday, July 9. It%26rsquo;s not an art fair, but something homegrown and more organic: ArtHouston, an open house that showcases hometown galleries and touts their hottest talent. Conceived 32 years ago as Introductions to inject life into the slumbering summer art scene, ArtHouston%26rsquo;s exhibitions have taken on greater import through the decades with the increasing global prominence of the Core Program at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston%26rsquo;s Glassell School of Art. Some of the most important debuts of the Core crop during ArtHouston have been: Shahzia Sikander at Barbara Davis Gallery, 1996 (including the artist%26rsquo;s first-ever wall drawing); Julie Mehretu at Barbara Davis Gallery, 1998 (Mehretu%26rsquo;s paintings based on dizzying global maps and urban centers have meteorically risen from $1,000-some then to the million-dollar range now and have earned her a $500,000 MacArthur Award); and Leandro Erlich, whose 1999 %26ldquo;Rain%26rdquo; installation at Moody Gallery went directly to the Whitney Biennial 2000 eight months later. More than Core Fellows have had their day. Beijing-born Yun-Fei Ji soloed in Introductions 1990 at Meredith Long %26amp; Company to go on to the Whitney Biennial in 2004. And in 1999, Inman Gallery showed an obscure San Antonio talent, Dario Robleto, whose arcane conceptual sculptures employed strange materials such as stolen dime-store lipsticks and a cosmetic holder cast from melted LPs; Robleto also hopped the Whitney Biennial train (2004) and earned increasing national renown, all achieved while remaining in Texas.

The Bets Are On

%26ldquo;Dream Skipper%26rdquo; at Barbara Davis Gallery: Though we%26rsquo;re not always a fan of group shows for ArtHouston, any exhibition that combines international painter Mie Olise (who mines magic from modern fairy tales), with notable hometowners Joe Mancuso, Daniel McFarlane and Anthony Shumate is a must (July 9 %26ndash;%26nbsp;September 2).

Aboriginal Offerings at Booker-Lowe Gallery: Billed as %26ldquo;Affordable Australian Aboriginal Art,%26rdquo; this exhibition presents an enticing collecting opportunity to enter the
aboriginal realm, with all work between $250 and $2,500 (July 9 %26ndash;%26nbsp;September 14).

Paul Horn Selects at Colton %26amp; Farb Gallery: The wild man, aka provocateur Paul Horn, returns to curate a group view. Watch for Matt Messinger%26rsquo;s surreal paintings and sculpture tinged with graffiti, as well as Whitney Biennial%26ndash;exhibited Daniel Johnston of the cartoon-inflected drawings (July 9 %26ndash; August 20).%26nbsp;

Liz Hickok%26rsquo;s %26ldquo;Jiggling Geography%26rdquo; at De Santos Gallery: Any photographer who recreates American cityscapes in Jell-O has our attention. This West Coast artist was one of the %26ldquo;Discoveries of the Meeting Place%26rdquo; at FotoFest 2010 (through July 31).

Fashion Fusion at 4411 Montrose: Check out a full-on fashion convergence and pop-up boutique curated by Zo%26euml; Jackson-Jarra at 4411 Montrose%26rsquo;s new project space, The Venue, with daytime shopping (benefitting Yellowstone Academy) capped by an evening runway show (Saturday, July 9).

%26ldquo;A Pixelated Bunch%26rdquo; at G Gallery: Recent Row Houses exhibitor Sapphire Williams selects her faves in an edgy group view incorporating painting, sculpture and performance by some under-known up-and-comers (July 9 %26ndash; 25).

Prescient Portraiture at Hiram Butler Gallery: %26ldquo;Faces%26rdquo; pairs unforgettable visages on paper by Chuck Close, Timothy Greenfield-Sanders, Sherrie Levine, Vik Muniz and Elizabeth Peyton with a quartet of new diaphanous abstractions by Terrell James (through July 23).

Taking It to the Streets at PG Contemporary: Aerosol Warfare, which propels Houston%26rsquo;s graffiti movement, is paired with West Coaster John Stuart Berger to concoct a simmering lowbrow stew in %26ldquo;Street/Science%26rdquo; (July 8 %26ndash;%26nbsp;August 6).

%26ldquo;Art for Japan%26rdquo; at McClain Gallery: Four important Japanese masters contribute to this fund-raising effort for Red Cross Disaster Relief in Japan, including poetic painter Katsumi Hayakawa and lensman Nobuyoshi Araki of the transgressive bondage photography (July 9 %26ndash; August 6).
%26nbsp;%26nbsp;%26nbsp;
Lawrence Lee at Moody Gallery: Idiosyncratic drawings peopled with odd characters are the hallmark of this Texas A%26amp;M Commerce grad, who perhaps not coincidentally comes from the same school where Trenton Doyle Hancock and Robyn O%26rsquo;Neill attended (July 9 %26ndash; August 6).

Images:

Elizabeth Peyton%26rsquo;s RM, 2007, at Hiram Butler Gallery

John Stuart Berger%26rsquo;s Fabglamzilla, 2010, at PG Contemporary

Irene Namok%26rsquo;s Slow Coming in Tide (detail), 2010, at Booker-Lowe Gallery

Liz Hickok%26rsquo;s Coit Tower, 2009, at De Santos Gallery

Mie Olise%26rsquo;s Light House, 2011, at Barbara Davis Gallery

Dario Robleto%26rsquo;s I%26rsquo;ve Kissed Your Mother Twice and Now I%26rsquo;m Working On Your Dad, 1998. Collection Gregory Higgins, Dallas; courtesy Inman Gallery

Comments are closed.

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