Dallas Art Fair: Collector’s Conversation


What is your background in the art world? Was your first bigbreak being tapped as the director of Mixture Contemporary Art in Houston? The first museum exhibition I remember going to was a John Cage exhibition at The Menil Collection. The Menil in general has been extremely formative to my taste and education, almost as important as the Dallas Museum of Art and other Dallas-area museums like the Modern and the Kimbell. Before college, I didn%26rsquo;t have any formal art education, but these institutions were thrilling and wonderful places to me. I%26rsquo;m very thankful that they exist. It%26rsquo;s hard to say that being asked to be the director of MCA in Houston was my first big break because it seemed to happen organically. Moving to New York and finding employment in the gallery world there required much more tenacity since there is so much competition.
%26nbsp;
Why are you exhibiting in the Dallas Art Fair 2012? Because Dallas is one of the best places for contemporary art in the entire country. Funnily enough, I had to move away from Texas to understand the depth of respect that the art world has for the city and its collections. Also, I am very proud of my state and want to remain connected here. My husband%26rsquo;s family lives in Dallas, and they are thrilled when my job brings me to visit.
%26nbsp;
How and when did you get started in the Lower East Side Manhattan art scene? I chose the Lower East Side to open my gallery because my friends and I were already spending time there, and it was a natural fit. The neighborhood seemed alive, as it still does, while Chelsea can sometimes feel calcified. I moved to New York to be the director for Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, and then I worked for Andrea Rosen. I learned so much from both of these incredible women %26mdash; they both have such rich histories in New York and I am grateful to them both. Some time passed before I was convinced that opening my own gallery was the right move. I couldn't understand why New York needed another gallery when the city counted about 800 already in existence. Later, I realized that I only really followed the programs of about 10 stellar galleries, and that seemed like a much more manageable group to aim for.
%26nbsp;
What artists will you be bringing to the Fair? We are still planning out our presentation, but most likely we'll bring artists who already have a link to Texas, as well as our most special painters, like Michael Bauer and Jon Pestoni, and perhaps our newest artist, Cynthia Daignault.
%26nbsp;
Are you still in touch with artists, collectors, nonprofits and museums in Texas? Absolutely %26mdash; I stay in touch with as many Texans as I can!
%26nbsp;
Who are the Texas artists you represent? We actually represent three artists who are from Texas: Andy Coolquitt and J. Parker Valentine, who both grew up outside of Austin, and Alan Reid, who has Dallas roots. I actually met both J. Parker and Alan in New York and only later realized that they were from Texas. We had an instant, easy rapport that I attribute to our shared background.
%26nbsp;
What has been Lisa Cooley Fine Art%26rsquo;s greatest achievement, show or milestone? What are you most proud of? Just being open and continuing to grow during the last four years. We opened in 2008, right before the economy crashed, and although it's been challenging, we've been growing all along. And, thankfully, our artists have received a number of kudos, which I'm very proud of. For instance, Erin Shirreff's work has been acquired by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Guggenheim Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Alexandra Olson's work is in the collection of the L.A. County Museum of Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. Andy Coolquitt is about to have his first solo museum show at the Blaffer, and Josh Faught had a solo presentation at the Seattle Art Museum.
%26nbsp;
How do you determine if a young artist has potential %26mdash; is interesting, has a future and would be someone you%26rsquo;d like to represent? I tend to look for a multitalented artist %26mdash; someone who will continue to make dynamic work for years and years, as opposed to making one kind of work forever.

%26nbsp;

Dallas Art Fair: April 13 %26ndash; 15, 2012, Preview Gala April 12

dallasartfair.com

Comments are closed.

Dallas Art Fair: Collector’s Conversation


What is your background in the art world? Was your first bigbreak being tapped as the director of Mixture Contemporary Art in Houston? The first museum exhibition I remember going to was a John Cage exhibition at The Menil Collection. The Menil in general has been extremely formative to my taste and education, almost as important as the Dallas Museum of Art and other Dallas-area museums like the Modern and the Kimbell. Before college, I didn%26rsquo;t have any formal art education, but these institutions were thrilling and wonderful places to me. I%26rsquo;m very thankful that they exist. It%26rsquo;s hard to say that being asked to be the director of MCA in Houston was my first big break because it seemed to happen organically. Moving to New York and finding employment in the gallery world there required much more tenacity since there is so much competition.
%26nbsp;
Why are you exhibiting in the Dallas Art Fair 2012? Because Dallas is one of the best places for contemporary art in the entire country. Funnily enough, I had to move away from Texas to understand the depth of respect that the art world has for the city and its collections. Also, I am very proud of my state and want to remain connected here. My husband%26rsquo;s family lives in Dallas, and they are thrilled when my job brings me to visit.
%26nbsp;
How and when did you get started in the Lower East Side Manhattan art scene? I chose the Lower East Side to open my gallery because my friends and I were already spending time there, and it was a natural fit. The neighborhood seemed alive, as it still does, while Chelsea can sometimes feel calcified. I moved to New York to be the director for Nicole Klagsbrun Gallery, and then I worked for Andrea Rosen. I learned so much from both of these incredible women %26mdash; they both have such rich histories in New York and I am grateful to them both. Some time passed before I was convinced that opening my own gallery was the right move. I couldn't understand why New York needed another gallery when the city counted about 800 already in existence. Later, I realized that I only really followed the programs of about 10 stellar galleries, and that seemed like a much more manageable group to aim for.
%26nbsp;
What artists will you be bringing to the Fair? We are still planning out our presentation, but most likely we'll bring artists who already have a link to Texas, as well as our most special painters, like Michael Bauer and Jon Pestoni, and perhaps our newest artist, Cynthia Daignault.
%26nbsp;
Are you still in touch with artists, collectors, nonprofits and museums in Texas? Absolutely %26mdash; I stay in touch with as many Texans as I can!
%26nbsp;
Who are the Texas artists you represent? We actually represent three artists who are from Texas: Andy Coolquitt and J. Parker Valentine, who both grew up outside of Austin, and Alan Reid, who has Dallas roots. I actually met both J. Parker and Alan in New York and only later realized that they were from Texas. We had an instant, easy rapport that I attribute to our shared background.
%26nbsp;
What has been Lisa Cooley Fine Art%26rsquo;s greatest achievement, show or milestone? What are you most proud of? Just being open and continuing to grow during the last four years. We opened in 2008, right before the economy crashed, and although it's been challenging, we've been growing all along. And, thankfully, our artists have received a number of kudos, which I'm very proud of. For instance, Erin Shirreff's work has been acquired by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Guggenheim Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. Alexandra Olson's work is in the collection of the L.A. County Museum of Art and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. Andy Coolquitt is about to have his first solo museum show at the Blaffer, and Josh Faught had a solo presentation at the Seattle Art Museum.
%26nbsp;
How do you determine if a young artist has potential %26mdash; is interesting, has a future and would be someone you%26rsquo;d like to represent? I tend to look for a multitalented artist %26mdash; someone who will continue to make dynamic work for years and years, as opposed to making one kind of work forever.

%26nbsp;

Dallas Art Fair: April 13 %26ndash; 15, 2012, Preview Gala April 12

dallasartfair.com

Comments are closed.

Sign up for the DADA Newsletter