Collector’s Conversation Brought to You by the Dallas Art Fair


Describe briefly your trajectory. I opened the gallery during the second year of my masters program at California College of Arts in San Francisco. Looking back, I am not sure there was a clear trajectory, but I knew even in undergraduate school that I wanted to be involved in supporting artists. In fact, I transformed my artist studio at Otis College into an exhibition space. At the end of my first year at CCA, I took the opportunity to run programming and curate exhibitions in Frankfurt at the Kunstverein for four months, where I familiarized myself with numerous project spaces and small galleries. Upon my return to San Francisco, I decided I was ready and opened my own project space in the Dogpatch. Looking back, it was quite a brave move, and I%26rsquo;m glad I was young enough to not over-think it.%26nbsp;

Why are you exhibiting at the Dallas Art Fair 2012? 2011 was a great year fair-wise for the gallery, with a strong showing in Europe including Frieze, London, and FIAC in Paris. In 2012, we wanted to focus on expanding our U.S. presence and also reaching out to a new collector base. I have met so many wonderful people from the area, and Dallas is such a culturally diverse city, with amazing museums, collections and a growing art scene, that it seemed like the logical choice. I also like that it is an intimate fair with a thoughtful platform, and this resonated strongly with the gallery and its program.

What was your first big break? It is difficult to identify any one single thing. Opening a gallery is always a risk, and its success often relies on the support of the greater community and its involvement ...

Describe your aesthetic as a gallerist. What sets apart the exhibitions you curate and your stable of artists? How important is curatorial practice to owning/running a gallery? It is difficult to really define what we do as an %26ldquo;aesthetic%26rdquo; since our roster includes such a varied and rich group of artists, from photographers to installation artists, as well as everything in between. But the one strong link is our collective commitment to curatorial rigor. Since the beginning, I knew I was more interested in presenting compelling exhibitions, much more than simply showing art, and that is something we continue to pride ourselves on. It has always been my intention to contribute to a greater dialogue around contemporary art, and introduce new and unexpected perspectives. All of our exhibitions strive to present that through an engaging and challenging visual experience. This is an ethic we bring to everything we do, including booths at art fairs, which we conceive of as mini group shows. I come from a curatorial background and it%26rsquo;s impossible for me to see things from any other perspective.

Where do you find new talent? What do you look for in terms of artists you represent? There is no clear-cut answer for this, since it%26rsquo;s really an open-ended process, which simply means being as engaged as possible. Our collaborations arise from studio visits, a pivotal aspect of what we do, but also just seeing shows, tapping into what%26rsquo;s going on at art fairs (something which is harder than it sounds especially when you%26rsquo;re participating). I also cherish my dialogues with colleagues and individuals I respect, like curators, writers, advisors, etc. There is no real formula, but it is like any other relationship, a lot depends on chemistry and a common set of values.

What affinities are there between the California art scene and that in Texas, if any?%26nbsp;I don%26rsquo;t have enough of a nuanced grasp of the Texas scene to make such a qualification. However, from my initial impression, it seems that it has affinities to the Bay Area scene, which has long thrived on its independence. One of the reasons the gallery has developed in San Francisco is my ability to work according to my own rules and expectations. There is no given model for how a gallery functions and that has provided a lot of creative freedom. I suspect Texas functions in very much the same spirit. And I look forward to finding out.

Whom do you know in Texas? Any relationships with museum curators, artists, collectors or gallerists? I am just beginning to familiarize myself with the Texas scene and so far most of the people I know are advisors with the exception of a few curators who mostly reside in Houston. However, I have numerous colleagues who have been doing business in Dallas and participating in the fair and I look forward to making introductions to the collectors and art lovers they keep raving about.

When were you first introduced to the art world? Did you grow up in a family of collectors? My grandparents were collectors and I was exposed to a good deal of art from early on. However, I%26rsquo;m not sure how much this affected my trajectory as a gallerist, aside from giving me a taste for art and an interest in collections. I think my relationship to art was always intuitive; I was fascinated by the creative process, and also the rich collaborations that could arise. This is what initially attracted me and what continues to fuel what I do, this constant exchange of creative dialogues.

What artists do you collect personally? I have a modest collection, and largely it is comprised of pieces by the artists I work with or have worked with. I think collecting is much more than acquiring individual pieces; I think it is a way to enter into a dialogue with someone%26rsquo;s practice and to support that practice. Whenever I want to work with someone, I think it is important to show that support and confidence and build a relationship on something concrete; even if it%26rsquo;s just a small drawing, it can have a very weighty significance. A few of my most recent acquisitions are Florian Schmidt, Aspen Mays, Brock Enright, Liam Everett, Hugh Scott-Douglas and Hayal Pozanti.

Whom will you exhibit at the Dallas Art Fair 2012? Any surprises in store? We%26rsquo;re still developing the concept for our Dallas presentation, but as always we hope it is a discovery for collectors and viewers alike. We like to undertake fairs like any other exhibition, and present a thoughtful and visually engaging experience that will linger long after the show comes down.

%26nbsp;

Dallas Art Fair:

April 13 %26ndash; 15, 2012; Preview Gala April 12.

www.dallasartfair.com

%26nbsp;

Images:

Jessica Silverman. Photo by Nancy Rothstein.

Janet Hobby. Photo by Julie Soefer.

Comments are closed.

Collector’s Conversation Brought to You by the Dallas Art Fair


Describe briefly your trajectory. I opened the gallery during the second year of my masters program at California College of Arts in San Francisco. Looking back, I am not sure there was a clear trajectory, but I knew even in undergraduate school that I wanted to be involved in supporting artists. In fact, I transformed my artist studio at Otis College into an exhibition space. At the end of my first year at CCA, I took the opportunity to run programming and curate exhibitions in Frankfurt at the Kunstverein for four months, where I familiarized myself with numerous project spaces and small galleries. Upon my return to San Francisco, I decided I was ready and opened my own project space in the Dogpatch. Looking back, it was quite a brave move, and I%26rsquo;m glad I was young enough to not over-think it.%26nbsp;

Why are you exhibiting at the Dallas Art Fair 2012? 2011 was a great year fair-wise for the gallery, with a strong showing in Europe including Frieze, London, and FIAC in Paris. In 2012, we wanted to focus on expanding our U.S. presence and also reaching out to a new collector base. I have met so many wonderful people from the area, and Dallas is such a culturally diverse city, with amazing museums, collections and a growing art scene, that it seemed like the logical choice. I also like that it is an intimate fair with a thoughtful platform, and this resonated strongly with the gallery and its program.

What was your first big break? It is difficult to identify any one single thing. Opening a gallery is always a risk, and its success often relies on the support of the greater community and its involvement ...

Describe your aesthetic as a gallerist. What sets apart the exhibitions you curate and your stable of artists? How important is curatorial practice to owning/running a gallery? It is difficult to really define what we do as an %26ldquo;aesthetic%26rdquo; since our roster includes such a varied and rich group of artists, from photographers to installation artists, as well as everything in between. But the one strong link is our collective commitment to curatorial rigor. Since the beginning, I knew I was more interested in presenting compelling exhibitions, much more than simply showing art, and that is something we continue to pride ourselves on. It has always been my intention to contribute to a greater dialogue around contemporary art, and introduce new and unexpected perspectives. All of our exhibitions strive to present that through an engaging and challenging visual experience. This is an ethic we bring to everything we do, including booths at art fairs, which we conceive of as mini group shows. I come from a curatorial background and it%26rsquo;s impossible for me to see things from any other perspective.

Where do you find new talent? What do you look for in terms of artists you represent? There is no clear-cut answer for this, since it%26rsquo;s really an open-ended process, which simply means being as engaged as possible. Our collaborations arise from studio visits, a pivotal aspect of what we do, but also just seeing shows, tapping into what%26rsquo;s going on at art fairs (something which is harder than it sounds especially when you%26rsquo;re participating). I also cherish my dialogues with colleagues and individuals I respect, like curators, writers, advisors, etc. There is no real formula, but it is like any other relationship, a lot depends on chemistry and a common set of values.

What affinities are there between the California art scene and that in Texas, if any?%26nbsp;I don%26rsquo;t have enough of a nuanced grasp of the Texas scene to make such a qualification. However, from my initial impression, it seems that it has affinities to the Bay Area scene, which has long thrived on its independence. One of the reasons the gallery has developed in San Francisco is my ability to work according to my own rules and expectations. There is no given model for how a gallery functions and that has provided a lot of creative freedom. I suspect Texas functions in very much the same spirit. And I look forward to finding out.

Whom do you know in Texas? Any relationships with museum curators, artists, collectors or gallerists? I am just beginning to familiarize myself with the Texas scene and so far most of the people I know are advisors with the exception of a few curators who mostly reside in Houston. However, I have numerous colleagues who have been doing business in Dallas and participating in the fair and I look forward to making introductions to the collectors and art lovers they keep raving about.

When were you first introduced to the art world? Did you grow up in a family of collectors? My grandparents were collectors and I was exposed to a good deal of art from early on. However, I%26rsquo;m not sure how much this affected my trajectory as a gallerist, aside from giving me a taste for art and an interest in collections. I think my relationship to art was always intuitive; I was fascinated by the creative process, and also the rich collaborations that could arise. This is what initially attracted me and what continues to fuel what I do, this constant exchange of creative dialogues.

What artists do you collect personally? I have a modest collection, and largely it is comprised of pieces by the artists I work with or have worked with. I think collecting is much more than acquiring individual pieces; I think it is a way to enter into a dialogue with someone%26rsquo;s practice and to support that practice. Whenever I want to work with someone, I think it is important to show that support and confidence and build a relationship on something concrete; even if it%26rsquo;s just a small drawing, it can have a very weighty significance. A few of my most recent acquisitions are Florian Schmidt, Aspen Mays, Brock Enright, Liam Everett, Hugh Scott-Douglas and Hayal Pozanti.

Whom will you exhibit at the Dallas Art Fair 2012? Any surprises in store? We%26rsquo;re still developing the concept for our Dallas presentation, but as always we hope it is a discovery for collectors and viewers alike. We like to undertake fairs like any other exhibition, and present a thoughtful and visually engaging experience that will linger long after the show comes down.

%26nbsp;

Dallas Art Fair:

April 13 %26ndash; 15, 2012; Preview Gala April 12.

www.dallasartfair.com

%26nbsp;

Images:

Jessica Silverman. Photo by Nancy Rothstein.

Janet Hobby. Photo by Julie Soefer.

Comments are closed.

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