Art Notes


Girl Power Plus a Giant Inflatable: A ground-breaking exhibition at McKinney Avenue Contemporary pairs two generations of female artists with a decidedly feminist stance. Mary Ann Edelson, who burst onto the SoHo scene in the 1960s, brings works circa 1981 through%26nbsp;1997 %26#8212; mostly small-scale, mixed-media offerings, plus an installation materialized as a vast spider web. Concurrently, Houston and New York%26#8211;based Molly Gochman unfurls the series %26#8220;Lullabies,%26#8221; which interweaves photography, sculpture, video and audio into a hypnotic installation (November 7 %26#8211;%26nbsp;December 12) ... At Victory Park, Artopia on Saturday, November 13, includes headlining Dallas artist Billy Zinser. His work is hard to miss: It%26#8217;s a 20-foot-tall, forced-air inflated sculpture, series three of his ongoing Macrodon toys. Zinser%26#8217;s day job is as an art dealer at Marty Walker Gallery.
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Museum Must-Sees: If you identify with the Middle Ages, the Dallas Museum of Art%26#8217;s contemplative exhibition %26#8220;The Mourners%26#8221; is required viewing (through January 2). The DMA is co-organizer of this gem-like show of tomb figures from the 14th- and 15th-century Court of the Burgundy, which once reigned over a territory encompassing France, Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands. The DMA%26#8217;s Heather McDonald serves as co-curator for this seven-city national tour %26#8230; Make tracks to the Amon Carter Museum in Fort Worth for %26#8220;American Modern: Abbott, Evans, Bourke-White.%26#8221; The exhibition showcases Walker Evans alongside the lesser-known Berenice Abbott and Margaret Bourke-White, focusing on the trinity%26#8217;s classic documentary black-and-whites %26#224; la the 1930s (through January 2).
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Where Would You Go?: Christopher Blay is an installationist whose time-machine vignette with the viewer as performer is creepy cool. Catch his final days at Conduit Gallery in the Project Room (through November 13).
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Refrigerator Man: ARTnews recently anointed former Texan Peter Saul, the acknowledged genius of the darkly comic figured canvas, as one of the best underrated artists, so Dallas Art Fair co-founder Chris Byrne%26#8217;s curatorial turn at the New York branch of international gallery Haunch of Venison %26#8212; a survey of 50 years of Saul%26#8217;s prodigious output %26#8212; seems perfectly timed (November 5 %26#8211; January 8). On ice are Saul%26#8217;s famed paintings of refrigerators (an early precursor to Pop art, the %26#8220;Icebox%26#8221; series continues today).
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Bookin%26#8217; It: Dallas Contemporary, one of the beneficiaries of the volume Texas Artists Today %26#8212; whose North Texas project leader is collector/patron Karla McKinley %26#8212; hosts the first Dallas book signing on Friday night, November 19, followed by another signing at the Nasher Sculpture Center on Saturday, November 20, 1 to 3 pm. See you there! %26nbsp;
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Images:
Billy Zinser%26#8217;s Macrodon (Series 3), 2010, at Artopia, Victory Park.
Molly Gochman%26#8217;s Topography of a Town from the %26#8220;Lullabies%26#8221; series, 2008, at The MAC. Photo courtesy the artist and Colton %26amp; Farb Gallery, Houston.

Comments are closed.

Art Notes


Girl Power Plus a Giant Inflatable: A ground-breaking exhibition at McKinney Avenue Contemporary pairs two generations of female artists with a decidedly feminist stance. Mary Ann Edelson, who burst onto the SoHo scene in the 1960s, brings works circa 1981 through%26nbsp;1997 %26#8212; mostly small-scale, mixed-media offerings, plus an installation materialized as a vast spider web. Concurrently, Houston and New York%26#8211;based Molly Gochman unfurls the series %26#8220;Lullabies,%26#8221; which interweaves photography, sculpture, video and audio into a hypnotic installation (November 7 %26#8211;%26nbsp;December 12) ... At Victory Park, Artopia on Saturday, November 13, includes headlining Dallas artist Billy Zinser. His work is hard to miss: It%26#8217;s a 20-foot-tall, forced-air inflated sculpture, series three of his ongoing Macrodon toys. Zinser%26#8217;s day job is as an art dealer at Marty Walker Gallery.
%26nbsp;
Museum Must-Sees: If you identify with the Middle Ages, the Dallas Museum of Art%26#8217;s contemplative exhibition %26#8220;The Mourners%26#8221; is required viewing (through January 2). The DMA is co-organizer of this gem-like show of tomb figures from the 14th- and 15th-century Court of the Burgundy, which once reigned over a territory encompassing France, Luxembourg, Belgium and the Netherlands. The DMA%26#8217;s Heather McDonald serves as co-curator for this seven-city national tour %26#8230; Make tracks to the Amon Carter Museum in Fort Worth for %26#8220;American Modern: Abbott, Evans, Bourke-White.%26#8221; The exhibition showcases Walker Evans alongside the lesser-known Berenice Abbott and Margaret Bourke-White, focusing on the trinity%26#8217;s classic documentary black-and-whites %26#224; la the 1930s (through January 2).
%26nbsp;
Where Would You Go?: Christopher Blay is an installationist whose time-machine vignette with the viewer as performer is creepy cool. Catch his final days at Conduit Gallery in the Project Room (through November 13).
%26nbsp;
Refrigerator Man: ARTnews recently anointed former Texan Peter Saul, the acknowledged genius of the darkly comic figured canvas, as one of the best underrated artists, so Dallas Art Fair co-founder Chris Byrne%26#8217;s curatorial turn at the New York branch of international gallery Haunch of Venison %26#8212; a survey of 50 years of Saul%26#8217;s prodigious output %26#8212; seems perfectly timed (November 5 %26#8211; January 8). On ice are Saul%26#8217;s famed paintings of refrigerators (an early precursor to Pop art, the %26#8220;Icebox%26#8221; series continues today).
%26nbsp;
Bookin%26#8217; It: Dallas Contemporary, one of the beneficiaries of the volume Texas Artists Today %26#8212; whose North Texas project leader is collector/patron Karla McKinley %26#8212; hosts the first Dallas book signing on Friday night, November 19, followed by another signing at the Nasher Sculpture Center on Saturday, November 20, 1 to 3 pm. See you there! %26nbsp;
%26nbsp;
Images:
Billy Zinser%26#8217;s Macrodon (Series 3), 2010, at Artopia, Victory Park.
Molly Gochman%26#8217;s Topography of a Town from the %26#8220;Lullabies%26#8221; series, 2008, at The MAC. Photo courtesy the artist and Colton %26amp; Farb Gallery, Houston.

Comments are closed.

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