Art Notes


Enlightening Stops: You can%26rsquo;t go wrong at The Menil Collection, home to a pair of exhibitions that are moving and poignant in different ways %26mdash; and very much in keeping with the sensitivity to art history and human rights championed by the de Menils. %26ldquo;Upside Down: Arctic Realities,%26rdquo; is curated by visual anthropologist Edmund Carpenter, whose ongoing %26ldquo;Wunderkammer%26rdquo; exhibit at the museum also is heavy on the power; artist Doug Wheeler devised the inspiring installation with its labyrinthine pathway,%26nbsp; display tables and wall niches for treasures of Arctic culture spanning millennia. This is one of the most exquisite exhibitions the Menil has ever mounted (though July 17) ... Also Menil way, take in the truths of %26ldquo;The Whole World Was Watching: Civil Rights-Era Photographs from Edmund Carpenter and Adelaide de Menil,%26rdquo; co-curated by the Menil%26rsquo;s Michelle White and Danielle Burns of the Gregory School, where it is also on view (through September 25 at the Menil; through August 20 at Gregory).

The Hometown Team: We%26rsquo;re making tracks to Darke Gallery, where Linda Darke continues her commitment to Houston talents via a solo for Wendy Wagner. This mid-career notable plays with a panoply of media %26mdash;%26nbsp;sculpture, installation, animation, craft and painting %26mdash;%26nbsp;in a whimsical exhibition that could be on the Cartoon Network (May 13 %26ndash;%26nbsp;June 10) ... At Colton %26amp; Farb Gallery, the first artist that this scribe ever interviewed, Sharon Kopriva, adds ghostly canines and a few phantoms to her repertoire, paired with a homecoming for Angelbert Metoyer, who rolls out his latest explorations in memory, time and the universe, told through films and glass-based works (both May 14 %26ndash;%26nbsp;June 25).

The Next Chapter: At McClain Gallery, Aaron Parazette leaves surfing behind with %26ldquo;Cloud Break,%26rdquo; an investigation of the push-and-pull between control, surface and geometry in contemporary abstraction (May 5 %26ndash;%26nbsp;June 11).

Heights-Arama: Don%26rsquo;t forget that edgy 11th Street Heights enclave, where cross-continental Indian and American painter Rahul Mitra comments on dual cultures at G Gallery (May 7 %26ndash; 29) and Ann Harithas%26rsquo; captivating collages triumph at Na%26uuml;-haus (May 7 %26ndash;%26nbsp;28).

Back to Lawndale: The buzz is thundering about Lawndale Art Center, which has triumphantly returned to a prime spot as a trend-spotter. Three of its most exhilarating artists in residence are highlighted this month:%26nbsp;conceptualist Anthony Shumate, painter Daniel McFarlane and provocateurs Hillerbrand+ Magsamen (through June 4).

Did You Say Titian?: Next month we%26rsquo;ll bring you an update about the masterful Titian/National Galleries of Scotland blockbuster at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, so stay tuned for a report on two of the greatest paintings of the Italian Renaissance (May 22 %26ndash;%26nbsp;August 14).

Images:

Top: Wendy Wager%26rsquo;s Piccadilly Circus, 2011, at Darke Gallery.

Below: Sharon Kopriva%26rsquo;s Hallowed Hall,%26nbsp; 2011, at Colton %26amp; Farb Gallery.

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Art Notes


Enlightening Stops: You can%26rsquo;t go wrong at The Menil Collection, home to a pair of exhibitions that are moving and poignant in different ways %26mdash; and very much in keeping with the sensitivity to art history and human rights championed by the de Menils. %26ldquo;Upside Down: Arctic Realities,%26rdquo; is curated by visual anthropologist Edmund Carpenter, whose ongoing %26ldquo;Wunderkammer%26rdquo; exhibit at the museum also is heavy on the power; artist Doug Wheeler devised the inspiring installation with its labyrinthine pathway,%26nbsp; display tables and wall niches for treasures of Arctic culture spanning millennia. This is one of the most exquisite exhibitions the Menil has ever mounted (though July 17) ... Also Menil way, take in the truths of %26ldquo;The Whole World Was Watching: Civil Rights-Era Photographs from Edmund Carpenter and Adelaide de Menil,%26rdquo; co-curated by the Menil%26rsquo;s Michelle White and Danielle Burns of the Gregory School, where it is also on view (through September 25 at the Menil; through August 20 at Gregory).

The Hometown Team: We%26rsquo;re making tracks to Darke Gallery, where Linda Darke continues her commitment to Houston talents via a solo for Wendy Wagner. This mid-career notable plays with a panoply of media %26mdash;%26nbsp;sculpture, installation, animation, craft and painting %26mdash;%26nbsp;in a whimsical exhibition that could be on the Cartoon Network (May 13 %26ndash;%26nbsp;June 10) ... At Colton %26amp; Farb Gallery, the first artist that this scribe ever interviewed, Sharon Kopriva, adds ghostly canines and a few phantoms to her repertoire, paired with a homecoming for Angelbert Metoyer, who rolls out his latest explorations in memory, time and the universe, told through films and glass-based works (both May 14 %26ndash;%26nbsp;June 25).

The Next Chapter: At McClain Gallery, Aaron Parazette leaves surfing behind with %26ldquo;Cloud Break,%26rdquo; an investigation of the push-and-pull between control, surface and geometry in contemporary abstraction (May 5 %26ndash;%26nbsp;June 11).

Heights-Arama: Don%26rsquo;t forget that edgy 11th Street Heights enclave, where cross-continental Indian and American painter Rahul Mitra comments on dual cultures at G Gallery (May 7 %26ndash; 29) and Ann Harithas%26rsquo; captivating collages triumph at Na%26uuml;-haus (May 7 %26ndash;%26nbsp;28).

Back to Lawndale: The buzz is thundering about Lawndale Art Center, which has triumphantly returned to a prime spot as a trend-spotter. Three of its most exhilarating artists in residence are highlighted this month:%26nbsp;conceptualist Anthony Shumate, painter Daniel McFarlane and provocateurs Hillerbrand+ Magsamen (through June 4).

Did You Say Titian?: Next month we%26rsquo;ll bring you an update about the masterful Titian/National Galleries of Scotland blockbuster at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, so stay tuned for a report on two of the greatest paintings of the Italian Renaissance (May 22 %26ndash;%26nbsp;August 14).

Images:

Top: Wendy Wager%26rsquo;s Piccadilly Circus, 2011, at Darke Gallery.

Below: Sharon Kopriva%26rsquo;s Hallowed Hall,%26nbsp; 2011, at Colton %26amp; Farb Gallery.

Comments are closed.

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