An Artful Night for the Dallas Children’s Advocacy Center


If you haven%26rsquo;t yet secured your tickets for the fifth annual Art + Advocacy Auction benefitting the Dallas Children%26rsquo;s Advocacy Center, you may want to snag a set post haste. (Click to dcac.org for deets.) The artful evening, held at Fashion Industry Gallery on November 3, will feature plenty of Southern-style bites, sweets courtesy of Pecan Lodge Catering, danceable beats from DJ Jennifer Miller and Paul Paredes and, of course, a live and silent auction brimming with works from more than 120 emerging and established artists. We had the chance to chat with three of those showcased artists %26mdash; Shane Pennington, Brian Gibb and Pamela Nelson. Just what did we find out? Hint: At age five, one of them wanted to work on a dump truck.

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Shane Pennington

Describe your style. What medium do you prefer to work in?

My style is conceptual and contemporary. I work in steel, stone, copper wire, video, cardboard %26mdash; basically any materials that I can get my hands on.
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What did you want to be at age five?

At age five I wanted to work on a dump truck. At age ten, my grandmother lived with my family and she was an artist. One afternoon I painted a landscape with her in our garage and she gave me a very expensive gold-leaf fame to put around the piece. I decided to walk my neighborhood and knock on all the doors to sell the painting for eight dollars. An elderly couple purchased it from me. My family still laughs about the experience because the gold-leaf frame was worth about $100. I guess you can say I started early as an artist. And that elderly couple got a deal.

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What or who inspires you?

A great piece of classical music.%26nbsp;Yves Klein's Monotone Symphony sends chills down my back. %26nbsp;

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Name three things that are always in your studio.

Incense, tons of paint and great music.

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%26nbsp;How did you choose what piece to donate to Art + Advocacy? What is it about the piece that you thought would be perfect to showcase at this event?

In selecting my piece for Art + Advocacy, I chose one that reflects my position and mood as an artist today. %26nbsp;I feel it%26rsquo;s important as artists to allow viewers to see the world around them through a different set of eyes or through our own personal experiences.

Artist Shane Pennington

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Name three things in your travel bag.

Twelve-inch black boots, twelve-inch black tennis shoes, twelve-inch black dress shoes. Of course now I have very little room for clothing. Another option is a second bag.

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%26nbsp;What%26rsquo;s the best advice you%26rsquo;ve ever received?

"To find your way, just enjoy making your art."%26nbsp;

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The worst?

%26ldquo;Walk behind that horse."%26nbsp;

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Brian Gibb

%26nbsp;Describe your style. What medium do you prefer to work in?

The prints that I make tend to have a very flat graphic sensibility to them, which is influenced by the immediacy that screen-printing affords. This is also prevalent in my paintings, but there is much more evidence of the human hand in them and a lot more narrative. In short, the prints are concise observations while the paintings are more layered in meaning.

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How would you describe your creative process?

It generally starts with some phrase or event, which conjures up imagery, preliminary drawings and then the painting or printmaking starts.

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What did you want to be at age five?

I don't think I had figured out yet, but I was super bummed on anyone who did not color within the lines.

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What or who inspires you?

My wife Misty Keasler is an amazing photographer, and inspires me constantly. We recently had our first daughter Sydney, who is inspires me in ways that no one ever has.

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%26nbsp;Name three things that are always in your studio?

Dixon Ticonderoga (pencil), paper, all things Apple.

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%26nbsp;How did you choose what piece to donate to Art + Advocacy? What is it about the piece that you thought would be perfect to showcase at this event?

Caroline Belanger asked me to create a print for the event. Hope and the DCAC go hand in hand so it came together pretty quickly. The biggest upside is that it is at an accessible price point. So this will be something that everyone attending the event can afford, and in turn support the cause. [Editor%26rsquo;s Note: Gibb will print live at the event and will offer a small run of signed and numbered prints on a first come, first serve basis.]

Brian Gibb's print for the Art + Advocacy Auction

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%26nbsp;Name three things in your travel bag?

Dixon Ticonderoga (pencil), sketchbook, mustache wax.%26nbsp;

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What's the best advice you have ever received?

"Always try and put a bit of yourself in everything you do."

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The worst?

"Don't print books in China."

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One thing that no one knows about me is...

I am a huge sports fan with football being at the top of the list. I know as much about it as I do about art.

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Pamela Nelson

Artist Pamela Nelson
Photo courtesy of Allison V. Smith

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Tell us what piece you will have featured at Art + Advocacy?

I collaborated with children at the Dallas Children%26rsquo;s Advocacy Center to create a special piece inspired by the American quilt. Each child chose his or her own paint to work with and helped to mix his or her own special individual color. The children then used the colors in harmony and patched them together in a painting.

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Why a quilt?

Quilts remind us of warmth, comfort and security. They are an American tradition for generations.

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