Archive for March, 2019

New York – Lucio Fontana: “On the Threshold” at Met Breuer Through April 14th, 2019

Lucio Fontana, On the Threshold (Installation View), via Art Observed Marking the first major U.S. survey of artist Lucio Fontana in more than forty years, The Met Breuer has assembled a landmark show of works from across the artist’s career, unpacking and reassembling disparate threads and conceptual projects from across the expanse of his work to arrive at […]... | Read More

New Podcast ‘The Double Shift’ Explores What It Means To Be A Working Mom

NPR's Korva Coleman talks to Katherine Goldstein about her new podcast, which looks at the lives of working mothers and childcare issues.

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A Conversation With U.S. Poet Laureate Tracy Smith

To kick off National Poetry Month, NPR's Korva Coleman talks with the nation's two-term poet laureate about the importance of poetry during divisive times.

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Fantasy Collides With African Culture In Blitz The Ambassador’s ‘Burial Of Kojo’

The new Netflix movie, "The Burial of Kojo," is a fantasy film confronting illegal mining in Ghana. NPR's Michel Martin talks with the film's director about the project.

(Image credit: Ofoe Amegavie/Ofoe Amegavie)

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Genevieve Oswald, The Soul Of The New York Public Library Dance Collection, Has Died At 97

Oswald started curating the collection when it had about 350 items in 1947, and built it into this: “You can walk into the dance division of the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts and request to see the ballet slippers of the early-20th-century ballerina Anna Pavlova, or a silk flower garland that adorned the modern-dance pioneer Isadora Duncan, or countless other items in... | Read More

Exploring A Different Way To Paint, And Center, The Black Body

Painter Elizabeth Colomba’s goals include getting Black women into Western art history – and changing how people look at Black women in general. “When you think about black women wearing a period dress, you have a tendency to think that they were serving other people, another ethnicity, and they were not in power. That’s where I break the stereotype. And that’s what... | Read More

Science Fiction Is Trying To Imagine A Way Out Of, And After, This Time Period [AUDIO]

Tobias S. Buckell: “Nora K. Jemisin  was just saying on Twitter the other day that in science fiction we have this venerable tradition of using metaphor to dig at some of these problems—like race and power and structure and history—and that it’s been a mistake, because in the past we would always use the metaphor assuming that our fellow readers and fans of the genre were... | Read More

Agnès Varda Made The Invisible Visible

In The Gleaners and I and Faces Places, Varda paid attention to the France that feels left behind by the powerful and rich. But there was a secondary benefit as well: “She had wanted to pay attention to people who were ‘invisible.’ And she did. One of those people was her.” – The Atlantic

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Agnès Varda Made The Invisible Visible

In The Gleaners and I and Faces Places, Varda paid attention to the France that feels left behind by the powerful and rich. But there was a secondary benefit as well: “She had wanted to pay attention to people who were ‘invisible.’ And she did. One of those people was her.” – The Atlantic

... | Read More

Butterworth’s Post-Atomic Wasteland

Two new collections of Michael Butterworth’s early short stories – stories he thought lost for good – show his early days as a literary SF writer. – Jan Herman

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